Educational Enticing Resultz

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How To Present Employable Skills That Scream CONFIDENCE

Do you have skills to interview the employer? This is a question you should ask yourself when seeking new/alternative employment. You are looking for employment and you find a perspective job that catches your eye. You are confident you possess the skills needed for the position and the pay range is acceptable; however, you are not sure if you have the skill set to ensure the perspective employer is a good fit for you.  It is important to know that all open qualified positions are not meant for you. The questions you are seeking an answer to are the following:

  1. Does my personality fit the current work place?
  1. Does the employer support professional development?
  1. Does the employer offer a career track within the business?
  1. Will this position build towards my career goal with the support of the identified supervisor?

The best approach to obtaining answers to the questions above is to present them in a conversational mode. When the employer asks if you have any questions for he/she this is the time to present yourself with confidence and interview the employer. Start with “Bounce Back” questions. Yes, Bounce Back some of the thoughtful questions the employer asked you. The employer expects to answer the standard questions such as expected start date, dress code expectations and starting pay. You want the perspective employer to know that you are a thinker and that you were paying attention during the interview process. Re-ask the questions which require thought. These questions look like the following:

Employer: What do you have to offer the company?

Interviewer: What career track do you have to offer the employee in the position available and how do you expect to develop this employee for professional growth?

Employer:  Why are you seeking new employment?

Interviewer: Why is this position available and what are your identified pitfalls you would like to avoid?

Employer: What are your career goals?

Interviewer: What are your strategic plans for the open position and how does this position tie into the business five year strategic plans for the business?

 

When you are relaxed your confidence is best received in a conversation mode versus an itemized list. This interaction assist with making a positive impact on the interviewer and they are more inclined to remember you when deciding on a viable candidate. When an employer asks you, “What do you have to offer the company?” and you bounce back the question with the following statement, “What career track do you have to offer the employee in the position available and how do you expect to develop this employee for professional growth?” The employer is now in the role of interviewee. The employer now has to convince you-the perspective employee- the open position is worth accepting.  When the employer is responding to your question, listen for specific responses which answer the following questions:

  1. Does the employer support professional development?
  1. Does the employer offer a career track within the business?

If the employer response does not offer specific examples to answer the above questions, make the employer commit to tangible and measureable examples. You are looking for dates, times and numbers of trainings, CEU’s, conferences and the like. You are also seeking example of positions employees can be promoted to from the open position. Obtaining the commitment is accomplished by acknowledging the information presented and offering positive feedback to demonstrate your listening skills. Then simply present your question again.

When an employer is attempting to sell an open position to a candidate it is very important to understand the history of an open position to date. If a position has been with a company since inception, you want to know the turnover rate and the purpose of the vacancy on each occasion. This information will tell you the life expectancy of a position and provide insight on your next career steps. Recall the employer inquired the following “Why are you seeking new employment?” By asking the employer “Why is this position available and what are your identified pitfalls you would like to avoid?” you will receive the answer to the following two questions:

  1. Does my personality fit the current work place?
  1. Will this position build towards my career goal with the support of the identified supervisor?

 

If you have a personality that is predominately professional in the work place, you may not fit well in a work environment that supports sharing personal information such as family status and progress, weekend plans and vacation outcomes with your co-workers. It is important to have a good fit with personalities in the work place because you may feel social conversation contributes to not enough work is accomplished and your employer may feel the employees are on task.  It is important to know yourself in order to decide if a work place would be a good fit with your personality. The second half of this compound question, “….what are your identified pitfalls you would like to avoid?” can assist with identifying two important pieces of information which are listed below:

  1. Identifying if the position is a building block for your professional career goals.
  1. Receiving a verbal commitment from the supervisor to ensure the success of the position.

Securing answers to the four questions identified above during a relaxed conversation offers the following benefits:

*Present you are qualified for the position during the employer’s set of questions.

*Puts the interviewee in control of the interview because you close the conversation when ready with the phrase, “I look forward to hearing from you.”

*Leave the interviewer impressed with your confidence by interviewing the employer for a reciprocated relationship.

 

An employer is seeking a viable candidate who posses skill, knowledge and confidence. Is this you?

 

Tips for a successful interview: How to increase your chance to receive an employment offer

Schedule your interview for the first or last person on interview day.

Connect with the interviewer. Find something you have in common and speak on that topic for a few moments.

Ask specific industry related questions that include statistics, political impact, social impact or professional best practices.

Speak about the industry’s current trends and growth.

Share professional contributions offered to industry on personal time such as

Volunteer hours

Contribution to the field’s literature

Professional organization participation

 

Tiffany

Educational Columnist Enticing Resultz Magazine

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